Pino Daeni’s Lovable Women

Purity
One of my favorite paintings. For obvious reasons.

Pino Daeni’s depiction of beautiful women is glorious. His women are stunning, each having that something which can be roughly translated to ‘I was created to break your heart’.

Alabaster

Woman with a Hat
Believe it or not, what I like most in this portrait is the hat.

I find Pino’s women lovable because of their expression rather than their partial nudity. All beautiful bodies look the same, but every beautiful face is unique.

Love Notes

Evening Repose

Solace

If I would meet any of these women on the street, I would toss my hat, burn my books, and fall in love. Madly.

Royal

Pino died in 2010. He was born in Italy but lived mostly in the US, where besides painting, he illustrated book covers and movie posters.

White Rhapsody

And no, I have not made love with myself while creating this post, nor do I plan to after publishing it. I am not like that. I will go eat soup thinking of my story, and then do the dishes wearing my hat. Really.

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11 thoughts on “Pino Daeni’s Lovable Women

  1. “If I would meet any of these women on the street, I would toss my hat, burn my books, and fall in love. Madly.”

    “And no, I have not made love with myself while creating this post, nor do I plan to after publishing it. I am not like that. I will go eat soup thinking of my story, and then do the dishes wearing my hat. Really.”

    Beautiful art. I knew nothing of Daeni six minutes ago, but have instantly become a fan. The female body is depicted with class — it baffles me why so many treat theirs like trash.

    And your commentary made it even better.

    -A.M.

    1. I agree on your comment on the female body. The most beautiful thing in the universe, after a hat.

      I wonder, what’s your first name? Or should I just call you A.M. ?

  2. Beautiful story and amazing paintings! I didnot know about Pino Daeni too ! I will check more painting of him (^_^) Thank you for shairing and also thank you so much for visiting my blog(^_^)

  3. I, too, knew nothing of Pino Daeni until now.

    Last night, I watched a documentary called “The Woodman’s,” in which Francesca Woodman, an extremely talented young photographer, ended her life very early. These paintings remind me of some of her works, though the paintings have the essence of purity, femininity and softness that Francesca’s photographs did not.

    The paintings are beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

      1. Quite possibly, yes. She referred to posthumous notoriety in her journal more than once, and she was quite unappreciated at the time by the art world.
        Both her parents were artists, though I think one of her parents was not worthy of the title and one mediocre, and in fact, were self absorbed and seemingly unable or unwilling to bond with their daughter. In fact, in the film, they never say they loved her or speak of guilt or even call her their daughter. It disgusts me.
        I don’t believe she was loved and suffered emotionally from this, even though this isn’t mentioned in the film
        The trigger for her suicide may have been a series of unexpected bad events and personal epiphany.

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