Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much

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Blogging can take over your writing life. You may have reached a point where you have to ask yourself this question — is blogging distracting me from my more ambitious work?

Many of us have started our blogs thinking it’s good for our writing careers. We need more than good writing if we want to be writers, we know. We need the exposure that a blog can bring us. We need an online reputation. We need connections. Blogging can help bring us all of these.

But every minute you spend writing a blog post or reading comments is a minute you don’t spend working on your larger writing projects. And there will be many days when blogging will seem so much easier than revising that long manuscript you’ve been working on for years.

You know why most of the world’s famous authors don’t have blogs or blog only occasionally? Because blogging regularly takes time. It’s not just the writing itself that’s time consuming, but reading and commenting on other blogs — an intrinsic part of blogging.

When I started this blog, I used to publish at least three posts a week. Over the years, I felt the need to post less and less. Now I rarely publish more than one post a week. I still enjoy it, but I’m cautious about it. Blog posts have a limited shelf life.

Blogging is good for writers who are just starting out. It helps them form the habit of writing regularly, challenges them to come up with ideas for posts, and encourages them to polish their writing before pushing Publish.

Take it easy. Don’t get carried away by the easy gratification that likes, comments, shares, and new followers can bring you. Don’t blog more than you have to. And if you end up in a place where you have to force yourself to publish on your blog because your conscience calls for it — and it will if you invest time and effort into your blog — it’s time to slow down. Post less. Get rid of your posting routine, if you have to.

You don’t have to give up on your blog or the friends you’ve made through it. But don’t let blogging become an obligation, either. If it does, it will eat up your writing time. And it will show up in your posts, too.

Here’s a truth — blogging won’t necessarily make you a better writer. Okay, it will, but only up to a point. After that, blogging will only make you a better blogger.

Blogging, as most things is life, is best served with moderation.
Don’t blog too much.

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Do you agree? Do you feel that blogging takes over your writing life?

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26 thoughts on “Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much

  1. Very helpful advice. Thanks for sharing this. Blogging for writers is just a tool of exposure, a way of attracting loyal readers who will later buy our books. It’s basically a means at our disposal to shout at the world, ”I, too, exist. Listen to my voice.” But nothing more than that. We are writers for a reason: because we write. That’s what we do, therefore writing, rewriting and critiquing should be our primary concerns.

  2. “Don’t blog too much”. That is why I learned to combine short self-written posts with valuable reblogged material. My most important written works are outside the blogosphere.

  3. I just completed my Degree in Journalism and i love sport, infect i love writing about sport. I started my blog to learn how to write about other different things in life. What you saying its true it does take a lot of my time because i want to post three times a week and it’s killing me.

  4. Interesting article and here’s my take. I’m an artist and my blog is a diary for all of works in progress. It’s my home of adventure and curiosity. I felt exactly as you talk about. I post weekly and all this feels like so tedious and takes the fun out of my art projects. I have since them worked a schedule out that allows me to set up posts one month in advance. I carve a week to do this. The projects come from the previous month’s weekly projects. I love this and makes so much sense. I also keep my blog short and sweet. Well try to and am still working.

  5. Thank you. I have only recently started blogging, and what you say is true: it is very easy to get caught up in the likes and comments. I am still finding my “voice”, and seeing where my own strengths lie. Having said that, it is time to start working on lengthier, more challenging projects.

  6. I agree to a point. My Doctors included writing in my treatment. I have spent many years writing technical Manuals and Spec Books. Like most things in life, balance is the goal for most people. Improvement in the art of writing or creative writing; refinement of creative story telling.

  7. I think its just a matter of organization and prioritizing time. Blogging and writing a book both require lots of time but whether blogging gets in the way of writing depends on whether the author has implemented any structure into his writing life or not. Otherwise, blogging can be a powerful way for writers to build platform and get instant feedback from readers and when done well, can never be too much. Its all about balance.

  8. I believe that it is a clearly subjective matter and it depends on how each individual finds inspiration and prefers to write. Also it depends on how you manage your time me as a school magazine writer (journalist) prefer writing a blog than writing a book. As I mentioned before it is a clearly subjective matter that not only depends on you and your decisions but also on your surroundings. (applies on all subjective points). On the other hand yor article was well supported.

  9. I totally agree with you! I’m trying to finish my third blog and it’s so difficult because of my other priorities. And yes! Blogging also involves reading other blogs and talking to your fellow bloggers. And as we all know it’s time consuming! So, set your work priorities straight and find a healthy balance between blogging and your career. In my case, it’s not writing a book😕 but report writing🙂

  10. Yes, I agree it can definitely take over. It’s a balance between writing, reading and staying connected with fellow writers, readers and fans. I have different periods where I focus on each one more than another… never all at once. Lately, it’s been blogging. I have a few non-writing deadlines by June 30th so I feel caught up, then it’s back to writing. Good post and thoughts!

  11. I agree to a point. I write books too, but I also take the time to blog, do social media, etc… It is a pain sometimes but what good is writing books if no one knows about them or who you are? An online presence just seems too important to miss out on today not to do it.

  12. well I am trying to use my blog to exploit my writing. I am trying to create a different concept on story telling using my blog. please provide some creative criticism.

  13. So true!

    I personally do not write for likes or comments. I simply love taking a topic, reading about it, forming thoughts, and then writing about it. It’s kind of soothing (and time-consuming indeed!). And you’re right when you say sometimes it’s easier to just write a blog post than working on your own book, though I’m trying to shift my focus towards the latter.

  14. I’ve just started writing my newest blog. Everyday I am inspired to write, however in the back of my mind is the main protagonist of my WIP screaming that I’ve left her (literally) abandoned on the top of a mountain.

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